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brought wen to the miss america pageant, and turned pageant girls into wen girls. right now is the best time ever to give up your ordinary shampoo and try wen, because you can get 33 percent more cleansing conditioner and stay tuned to see how you can get the new wen travel kit absolutely free. this is our best deal ever. ♪ >> i'm sitting here with my friend chaz dean. chaz, so, i've been using wen for two years, right? and i just wanna say thank you, right off the bat-- >> you're welcome. >> --i just wanna thank you for my hair, because it was not like this before i started using wen. and, you know, being in the industry, they would fry my hair with, you know, with bad product, and using horrible irons. and it got so bad that i actually had to cut my hair off. >> i remember that. >> yeah. >> and people think you're doin' it--they probably think you're doin' it for the style, but they don't realize you're doing it 'cause of all the damage. >> exactly. >> and it's funny you say that, because i look back at all the celebrities that are out there on hit shows right now, and, if you watch
? >> and now "bbc world news." >> this is "bbc world news america", i am katty kay. edward snowden trades the transit zone for asylum in russia. ariel castro, the man who abducted three women in ohio, is sentenced to life in prison plus 1000 years. first, he tried to explain himself. he helped announce the royal baby to the world. the palacee you to foot man west become a celebrity in calcutta. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and around the globe. after a month of hiding out in the transit area of a moscow airport, tonight, former nsa contractor, edward snowden, has granted a years asylum in russia. this has strained relations between moscow and russia. president obama is under pressure to retaliate. an upcoming summit is in question. >> this was the moment this afternoon when edward snowden wearing a black rucksack with his back to the camera climbed into a car and disappeared into russia, the biggest country in the world. he had been stuck in limbo in the transit zone of the airport. he insisted he would not go to america to face trial. me aht, his lawyer showed c
? >> and now, "bbc world news america." president obama cancels a moscow summit with president putin. this after russia grantor -- granted edwards snowden asylum, sending at chill through relations. throughoutg flights the region. it cost billions and has the backing of key countries. inside a project which could power the future. pairs of atoms and infusing them together. this will release more energy. >> welcome to our viewers on public television in america and around the globe. today relations between the u.s. and russia and another snack when president obama canceled a planned meeting with president putin in russia next month. this comes just days after russia decided to grant asylum to the former intelligence analyst, edwards noted. -- edward snowden. two towering figures on the world stage. relations between russia and washington have never been more, has hadpresident obama a major diplomatic snub aimed at president putin. edward snowden is at the center of the latest round. the former contractor fled america after leaking government secrets. the u.s. is unhappy after russia g
talked to him on the program in depth. this is three hours. >> host: what does america owe blacks? >> guest: well, it owes them an acknowledgment of what happened. we don't like to talk about that in the states. even blast history month. there's a truncated version of what woodson had in mind. now it starts in slavely and moves forward and cuts us all from any access to african history. which was not what woodson intended. and so we obviously owe the value of our hire to those people who suffered so much and their families who dissented from those people who worked for 246 years for nothing. we owe them something for that. we owe them the story. we have been asked to expect that people can survive in good sound, psychology health. ashes and obliterated history. when i was a dmield richmond, virginia, we used to have a phrase that we used all the time from here to tim. but nobody knew what it was. nobody knew the providence of the world. didn't know where it was. didn't know it was a place. tim buck, which was a cross roads. it was also a site of one the world's first university. a
america." president obama announced his government surveillance program and assesses this deteriorating relationship with russia. >> we're doing things that are good for the united states and hopefully good for russia as well. but recognizing there are going to be some differences. we will not be able to completely disguise them. >> hiding in plain sight. this sicilian mafia boss was living in italy for decades. italy wants him back to serve his time. it is summer. it must be time for that vacation souvenir. we will trace how the trinkets have become big business. onwelcome to our viewers public television in america and around the globe. today president obama held a wide ranging press conference at the white house on the eve of leaving for his summer vacation. on the agenda was announcing new oversight and transparency in the surveillance programs that have come under fire. relations with russia were also front and center. presidenturged clinton to think forward instead of backward. tourged president putin think forward instead of backwards. u.s. foreign and defense
is pictures by google's street view. the images capture sites of america where rates of poverty and unemployment are high and educational opportunities are slim. photographs from a new american picture were included in the new photography 2011 exhibition at mona in new york. and also has been seen at exhibitions at la ball in paris and pier 21 here in san francisco. a monograph was published in 2011. and it is represented by local galleries and sf galleries would like to thank steven orts and the staff for the support of this event. we asked doug to speak today in order to draw threads from his work until asketon has street view which is currently on view in the gallery. doug i will turn it over to you. >> thanks for coming. i appreciate it. i am looking forward to giving you some details on this. i have 15 minutes, so i am not going to talk about all of them. there are so many layers of consideration to this and each of these areas could sort of veer off into its own talk and so i am going to talk to some of the things that may overlap with aaron's work. and i want to go throug
in 20th-century america, and how people and events have shaped economic decisions that affect our lives. those decisions usually involve tradeoffs. in 1980, congress designated over 100 million acres of alaskan land as national parks and wilderness areas. why did congress make that decision? how much did it cost the nation? in 1867, when the united states purchased the territory of alaska from russia, the acquisition was derided as wasted money. a century later, after two gold rushes, alaska braced for another. the new gold was oil. millions of barrels lay beneath the permafrost. during the 1970s, when the skyrocketing price of foreign oil threatened to devastate the american economy, alaskan oil seemed to promise hope for american energy independence. then along came 1979. revolutionary shock waves spread through islamic nations. iran cut off petroleum exports to the united states. america felt it was held hostage by dependence on foreign oil. as the price of a gallon of gas passed a dollar, congress debated closing off 100 million alaskan acres to mineral exploitation. the bill would
these products that land in your home. so let's tap into what is going on in america's factories. we have the chief economist from the national association of manufacturers. chad, thanks for being with us. obviously a lot of the goods that eric will sell, some of them are not made in america. so the drop in durable goods is not just a reflection on manufacturing, and this is an industry that has shown remarkable strength at times as this economic recovery has been going on. so give me your sense of this. >> we have seen a renaissance in manufacturing since the end of the recession. we have added about 500,000 workers. i mean just last week we had a study that said that u.s. manufacturing is going to be much more competitive over the next decade, and that's definitely one of those trends that you continue to hear more about. >> but competitiveness can be a code word for meaning you can make more stuff per hour worked. so a manufacturing resurgence has not meant a manufacturing job return. >> as i said we have added 500,000 workers in the sector over all, and you are continuing to see much
america." >> this is bbc world news america. reporting from washington, i am katty kay. as the world relate -- waits for a response to the theory and attack, forces are ready. >> we are ready to go. >> we are ready to go. order does come, what would military action look like? tonight, we assess the actions. a dream.id he had but 50 years after martin luther king delivered his famous speech, how much of it has come true? welcome to our viewers on public television in america and elsewhere around the globe. the u.s. is ready to launch a military strike against theory at a moments notice. that is what the defense secretary has told bbc news in an exclusive interview. the remarks came after suspected chemical attacks last week, and today, there was fresh fighting on the ground as the french point into the u.s. with some tough words on their own, saying they will punish those who decide to gas people. we start with our reporter who spoke to secretary chuck hagel. >> all dressed up and nowhere to go. were not able to carry out their work due to snipers, but due to which side, it is contest
. my name is jonathan betz. i'm from dallas, texas, and i'm an anchor for al jazeera america. >>my name is ranjani chakraborty, i'm from houston, texas. >>i'm kim bondy. >>nicole deford. >>and i'm from new orleans. >>san francisco, california. when i was a little kid, i just really loved the news. >>news was always important in my family. >>i knew as a kid that was exactly what i wanted to do. >>i learned to read by reading the newspaper with my great-grandfather every morning. >>and i love being able to tell other people stories. >>this is it, i want to be a part of this. >>this is what really drove me to al jazeera america. [[voiceover]] every sunday night, al jazeera america presents gripping films from the world's top documentary directors. >>thank god i didn't suffer what he had to go through. next sunday, the premiere of google and the world brain. >>this is the opportunity of our generation. [[voiceover]] it would be the world's greatest library under one digital roof. but at what cost? >>google could hold the whole world hostage. [[voiceover]] al jazeera america presents google
hand hand-out. >> awesome. >> taxpayers. >> so are all the hand-outs killing what made america great? good old fashioned hardwork? plus selling us out. government agencies making money off the private and the personal info. you won't believe what we found. and the opener of america's oldest brewery taking on big labor in a big way. and the reason job seekers on this holiday weekend. "cashin' in," working hard for you starts right now. ♪ ♪ >> eric: hi, everyone, i'm eric bolling. welcome to "cashin' in." the crew this week, wayne rogers, jonathan hoenig, michelle field, ebony k. williams. welcome, everybody. as we celebrate labor day this weekend let's open up a debate about the current state of labor in america. >> work is quickly replaced with hand-out and freebies. the recent report found in 35 states, welfare pays more than the minimum wage. that alone is driving the would-be workers to the open arm of our government. happy we feel recipient is a happy voter. what is the fall-out? welfare abusers, the takers are exploding. while the labor force, the makers are imploding. more
don't seem to be interested. >> welcome, everyone. >> al jazeera america makes its debut. will americans buy what they are selling? if dark clouds are bothering your white house, why not bring in something sunny? >> on the panel this week, writer and fox news contributor judy miller. syndicated columnist cal thompson. jim pinkerton. daily beast columnist kearse ton powers. fox news contributor richard grinnell. "fox news watch" is on right now. >> we can and must be more transparent. so i directed the intelligence community to make public as much information about these programs as possible. all these steps are designed to ensure that the american people can trust their efforts are in line with our interests and our values. to others around the world i want to make clear once again that america is not interested in spying on ordinary people. intelligence is focused, above all, on finding the information that's necessary to protect our people and in many cases protect our allies. >> that was the president earlier this month trying to convince americans his administration i
. visit america's best today tosk about our newest lenses, transitions vantage and transitions xtractive lenses. experience life well lit. ask which transitions adaptive lens is best for you this summer, new york state is back and open for business. with endless beaches, hundreds of miles for hiking...or biking. endless rivers and streams ready to take your breath away. and more than enough wineries to please every pallet. we're ready to make your new york state vacation perfect. there's never been a better time to vacation in new york state. plan your vacation at iloveny.com the new state of new york. welcome. >>> now from abc2 maryland's most accurate forecast. >> good morning. let's look at maryland's most powerful radar as of now. and we are nice and dry but we see showers and thunderstorms now in west virginia and also western maryland. this is working its way off towards the east. so before it's all said and done we could get showers and storms. more isolated and scattered in nature as we continue through the morning. and possibly still linger as we go into the -- lingering as we g
? >> stephen: really? is that really who you want to burn down with, america? (laughter) yeah, sure, you thought it was funny when your friend said dude, let's get the dog high. but how funny will it be when he says dude, let's eat the dog's penis. now who are the kids going to look up to at cnn? wolf blitzer, you're our only hope. but at least, folks, there are some celebrities we can still look up to thanks to stories like this. >> john malkovich usually not cast as a hero but is being credited with helping safe a man, real life. the acker helped a 77-year-old man who tripped on the sidewalk and then slashed his throat on some scaffolding. widnesses say that malkovich ran over, applied pressure to the man's neck and waited for an ambulance. >> stephen: truly heroic. and it is malkovich so probably a little creepy. and he is not hollywood's only hero. >> there was no special effects. it was the real thing when actor ryan gosling clutched a woman from the path of a speeding taxist when a 17-year-old flipped his mustang t was patrick dempsey to the rescue prying the boy out. >> does tin h
. fleischman. and by our sole corporate sponsor, mutual of america, designing customized individual and group retirement products. that's why we're your retirement company. >> welcome. for each of us, there are days that are turning points. a day that changes our personal life, or a day that changes the nation. sometimes, very rarely, it's one and the same day. just such a day happened to me on wednesday, august 28, 1963. i was 29 years old, the deputy director of the peace corps, with offices one block from the white house and a short walk from the lincoln memorial. that morning, largely on impulse, inspired by a friend, i joined the quarter of a million americans, people of every age and color, who had come for the march on washington. the event is now most famous for martin luther king, jr.'s "i have a dream" speech, but like many of the others there, i was first transfixed by one of the other speakers, the youngest on the platform. >> brother john lewis -- >> his name was john lewis. he had just been named head of sncc, the student nonviolent coordinating committee, and he was 23 years ol
threaten america's economic future. this program is about an hour. .. we don't have any of the fastest of the five cities in the world but comes to internet access in america, so we're not in the world leaders. we are somewhere in the middle of the pack. we also have a very deep digital divide. having inaccessible kampf is very correlated tear socioeconomic palace. -- have a people have internet connections at home, but that number is even lower for people with incomes under 30,000 per year. rich people tend to have an and also 9 percent of americans cannot access the internet revenue because it has not been built up to their area. >> added we get here? it seems like the internet was started here. what is the divide? why has it not gone to people sums? >> quite a street. a great thing about the internet is that you can reach anybody. that is the whole point. a universal a disability program all idea was that the content provider, like google, would not be subject to the lens of a telecom provider, but we have this huge split between the ideals and openness of the internet is dependent
at the heart of america for as long as -- i can't speak to the unreported history. i would assume there's paranoia then and certainly since the colonial days. america has been filled with conspiracy cultural paranoia. i don't know we're anymore more paranoid about any other country. the book is about america. the french are very paranoid people too, for all i know. >> because you are paranoid doesn't mean you're not being followed or watched. >> right. >> is there some legitimacy to conspiracy theory? >> people conspire. that's part of life. it's one reason why we're always going have conspiracy theories. or fear of conspiracy is that there's going to be some conspiracy. it's not like fear of vampiring dying out when they figure out there aren't any vampire. i have a chapter about the investigation of the '70s after watergate and the revelation came out about the cia, fbi, irs, nsa a couple of initials have come up. there are real conspiracy. but when i'm also trying to do in the book is to look at conspiracy theories that say absolutely nothing true about the object of the series but a
to the middle east that's different from america. he takes pride in that and on the basis of that he's made allies. to give snowden, a highly symbolic figure given the surveillance issue would have collided with what putin's done in international affairs. but at home he has a political elite. forget society. the political elite didn't want him to make this concession to the united states. >> rose: we conclude with julian guthrie, a journalist who has written a book about larry ellison called "the billionaire and the mechanic." it details the story of his quest for the america's cup. >> and it was expected that larry would partner with a better-known yacht club on san francisco's waterfront, the st. francis yacht club. and there's a fun story in the book about what happened or what didn't happen between the st. francis and larry ellison. but it's a story that doesn't come along very often and i became became very enamored with the drama of the two men before i became interested in the america's cup. >> rose: egypt, russia and the america's cup when we continue. captioning sponsored by rose c
about coming to america. wide spread furry and december stress in distress over this in australia. >> there really has. disbelief, shock. chris was a rising star having the time of his life over in the united states. we've all heard about gun violence in america, but this really brought it home. parents in australia who may have children on scholarships in the u.s. and students themselves, just out of disbelief that could happen to one of ours. this is the front page in melbourne here today, "the herold son." it says the team's american police shot our star. it's senseless and the reaction from the family as well as reporting from that baseball club just north on melbourne here. family, friends and team mates and people from the local baseball club have been down there this week. terribly sad, they are placing a baseball with tributes, flowers on the home base. his mother and father held back tears and described chris as another normal kid. he loved baseball and the game since he was 15 years old and loved it because he wanted to go to college in the u.s., piers, and saw this was
for our pre game report. what is coming up on tonight's show? >> thanks, america's sweetheart. you are as adorable as ever. >> thank you. >> some members of the 1972 miami dolphins will be skipping a white house ceremony about their win. tonight's outrage hating panel is outraged. and a new poll which ask is the hottest, the dumbest, the craziest and more. our panel will insult all of you at one point or another. and sunny, the new portuguese water dog. i even want to hang out with the obamas on saturday night. >> thank you, we'll see you at the end. let's welcome our guest. despite what we put her through on this show she returns our e-mails and schools back. imogen lloyd webber. her latest book is called "the twitter diaries." and he is as talented as he is tall. it is jake fogelness. check it out on something called itunes. bill schulz. he thinks she on the set of "the good wife" right now. and proving that 99% in life is having a good name and great hair. next to me is buck sexton, not to be confused with the philanthropist. >> a block. the lede. that's the first story. >> what
, america has much more nd cheaper natural gas. this means famils pay less to heat their homes. soon america may be self-sufficient in energy. also, if you are worried about global warming, burning natural gas releases less greenhouse gas than oil or coal. >> flack go feels wrong. it feels like you are pumping stuff into mother earth. >> jn: a liberal european environmentalist points out that europe promised to cut greenhouse gas emissions but didn't cut them. >> we managed tout half what you accidentally happened to do when you stumbled on fracking. >> john: so it brings fuel cheape, maybe better for the world. why are these people so mad? >> they worry about energy companies shoving these dangeroushemicals into the ground. >> this is seen sfraen a documentary called gas lane. >> the documentary gas land. >> they gave it director an emmy and matt damon features greedy energy companies destroying the promised land. >> if it happens to one of us, it could happen to us all of us. > john: yoko ono started artists against fracking. and so is the left wing media. >> itomes up by the millions of g
bila for a pre game report. jedediah, what is coming up ongp tonight's show? >> thanks, america's sweetheart. you are as adorable as ever.v our top story, some members of ths e 1972 miami dolphins will be swimming a white house ceremonyny because they don't like obama's politics. welcome to the club, boys. are they principal and admirable or meanies out to hurt our president's feelings. >> and a new poll asks which are the hottest, dumbest,t, craziest and we will find out more. and finally you will meet sunny, the family's new dog. i even want to hang out with the obamas on saturday night. >> see you at the end. let's welcome our tabes. well, despite what we put herde through on this show for several years she still returns our e-mails asking her to come back. i am here with imogen lloydebbe webber. her latest book is called "the twitter diaries." and he is as talented as he is tall. she on the set of "the good wife" right now. and proving that 99% in life is having a good name and great hair. next to me is buck sexton, not to be confused with the philanthropist. >> a block. the
on our website, al jazeera.com. >> al-jazeera america, a new voice in american journalism. >> introduces "america tonight". gas. >> a fresh take on the stories that connect to you. states. >> grounded. >> real. >> unconventional. >> we spent time with the gangster disciples. >> escape from the unexpected. >> i am a cancer survivor, not with an autographed jersey, and obama shared a few praise. >> coach shula retired with more wins than any coach in history. each time that record has been challenged, team after team has fallin short. >> michael eaves joins us to talk more about that. the president was having a lot latest online at aljazeera.com. ♪ >>> well were always in the background. nowadays they are more up front, you know? but we still have a lot more work to do, where the civil rights, you know, need to help women. because still women are getting paid less, and the fight is just so long and hard. >> what are the issues and challenges facing black women that are different than those that the larger community faces. >> uh-huh. which raises an interesting issue, avis, it seems black
that the united states of america makes our own decisions on our own time lines based on our values and our interests. now, we know that after a decade of conflict the american people are tired of war. believe me, i am a too. but fatigue does not absolve us of our responsibility. just longing for peace does not necessarily bring it about. history would judge us all extroardinar illy harshly if we turn a blind eye to use of wepons of massa destruction against all common understanding of decen decenty. we know we have a president that will do what he said he will do. whatever decision he makes in syria it will bear no resemblance to iraq, iran or libya. it will not involve boots on the ground and will not be open ended and it will not assume responsibility for civil war that is already well under way. the president has been clear, any actiony he might decide to take will be limited and tailored response to ensure ay despot's brutal and flagrant use of chemical weapon system is held accountable and ultimately we are committed, we remain committed and believe it's the primary objective is to ha
large scale hunger, malnutrition and starvation in america. >> scenes from across an increasingly dependent nation. this is fox news reporting, the great food stamp binge. i'm reporting from the u.s. department of agriculture. why the usda? for historical and political reasons, food stamps fall under the agriculture department's domain. in fact, food stamps will cost taxpayers a projected $78 billion this year. a staggering amount that's more than double the amount. other food asiftance. according to a just released poll, a majority of voters think most of the 46 million plus food stamp recipients are taking advantage and not truly in need. you heard stories of food stamp waste, fraud, and abuse. this hour we will also look at the cost of the recipients and the american character. during this show, you can share your thoughts via twitter. use #fox news reporting. we begin in new york city where one of the biggest proponents is looking to get more people signed up. >> individuals have a certain income limitation. >> you are watching a team of determined activists. preparing their p
to what could be a turning point for america and our involvement in syria. tonight, violent new clashes erupting right where the alleged chemical weapons attacks took place this week. and this evening a haunting new number. one million children sent fleeing from the violence, without homes, some of them ripped from their parents. that's the equivalent of all the children in boston and los angeles combined. tonight it's what the president is now saying about those alleged chemical attacks that signals america might soon be involved. abc's martha raddatz in the region on what it was the president said. >> reporter: these are the images that have had the white house huddled in marathon meetings. the suspected chemical attack, syrian women, children, estimates ranging upward of 1,000 killed. >> what we've seen indicates this is clearly a big event of grave concern. >> reporter: speaking to cnn, the president raising the stakes. >> that starts getting to some core national interests that the united states has. >> reporter: syria's chaos. its chemical weapons and its breeding of terror, a thr
the news to your money real. jazeera america. >> i'm kim bondy, growing up in news was always important. you have this great product that you are ready to share with the country. i'm a part of a team that is moving in the same direction. content while setting new standards in journalism. >> a new voice of journalism in the u.s., al jazeera america. america. >> we tell the human store ri from around the block, across the country. >> if joe can't find work, his family will go from living in a hotel to living in their car. >> connected, inspired, bold. >> technology is coming on in the next few decades may make nuclear waste obsolete. we should all hope that's the case. but right now the international atomic energy agency expects the united states alone to produce at least 32,000 tons added to the pile. my next guess has made a documentary about the nuclear waste time will will air on al jazeera. if the problem can't be solved by new technology. it's directed by michael madsen who we will see in this clip explaining what it's all about. >> i am now in this place where you should never come
farland, and author of the knewly released book, "the brotherhood: america's next great enemy," thank you, both, for being here. >> thank you. >> thank you. lou: kt, starting with you, the idea that the president wants to reurn, the administration wants to return to a democratically elected president, which is precisely what the egyptian people have demonstrated they want no more of after a year, think you would know more. >> well, those are not the actions anymore. the actions is can the military establish some kind of order because the option is not military againstmocracy. it's the military maybe gets a little bit of order going, or you have chaos and potentially another civil war. i thought, by the way, the introduction was great. you set up the fact that we were for the mubarak government before we were against them, and then we were for the morsi government before we against it, and for the military government before we were against it now. lou: thank you, and the with the -- the "we" referred there is a reference to the obama administration. eric, in the book, you call for a move against
, thank you very much. more news on al jazeera. "america night" is next. >>> two opposeing forces in a deadly struggle for power. ordinary egyptians and journalists call with pressure on the media. are we getting the full picture? >> also tonight, behind bars, the battle over the new orleans prison. who should control it? and who should pay for it? "america tonight" gets rare access to one of the most dangerous prisons in america. >>> and cancers unlikely enemy. how doctors have a cure with another deadly disease. >> she's like what? you're putting polio in my daughtedaughter's brain? are you serious? >>> hello. and welcome to "america tonight". we watch day by day the toll in egypt grow and become more vicious and we wanted to get a clearer sense what it's like for ordinary egyptians that it's tk*e divided after two years of turmoil. we sent and despite threats and attacks and great restrictions on the movements. >> reporter: when we arrived in cairo, the city was on fire. thousands of demonstrators had set the capitol in defiance of the newest -- the muslim brotherhood supporter
. the new militancy of 1963 changed america and inspired the world. but the promise -- the promise of democracy has not been made real for all of us. the promise is not real for people who work hard and play by the rules every single day, struggling to pay their bills. the promise is not real for retirees who work hard all their lives but don't know how they will make it day to day. the promise is not real for students who graduate under so much debt they wonder if they will ever climb out of it. and the promise is not real for all of us if it is not real for all of us it is not real for any of us. so we are here to replenish our spirit, restore our faith, and renew our activism. today we march for a nation where workers have decent pay, good benefits and rights on a job that no one can steal. today we march for a nation where the golden years of retirement are spent in peace, not in poverty. today we march for a nation where our children, no matter what they look like, where they live, or what they wear, can walk our streets in freedom and not in fear. today we march for a nation
unheard, fascinating news stories? >> they share it. >> social media isn't an afterthought. america. >> al-jazeera social america community online. >> this is your outlet for those conversations >> post, upload and interact. >> every night, share undiscovered stories. >> the stream, tomorrow night, latest online at aljazeera.com. ♪ >> it is a desperate gamble for millions of immigrants trying to cross the u.s.-mexico border. people will risk their own lives even that of their children for the opportunity. america tonight's rob reynolds traveled to the border areas to hear from the survivors about their challenges. some of the images in the stories they tell may be disturbing. >> reporter: a corner of the cemetery in texas is set aside for th the lost and left behind. these are the graves of unknown migrants from mexico and central america who died lonely deaths in the bad lands of south texas. >> it's horrible. it's senseless death. i don't really understand it. >> reporter: vinnie martinez is chief deputy sheriff of brooks county last year he reported well over 100 dead migrants. today
transformed america. she lives in williamstown, massachusetts with jim burns and their dog, roosevelt, and i know that -- [laughter] just on a personal note, for one thing, she's a great friend of the library and me as well, but james mcgreggor burns is the dean of scholars writing the first two full editions of radio vet's biography yearings ago, and he's watching the prasm later. we want to send the best to him in massachusetts. [applause] with that, pleased to introduce susan dunn. [applause] have you seen "foreign correspondence" starring herbert marshall? many of the students have not heard of al fred hitchcock or joel mccia, but you may know them. "foreign correspondent" debuted in the summer of 1940, and in the first scene, a newspaper editor asks his lackadaisical reporter, johnny jones, a question, what's your opinion of the present european crisis, mr. jones? what crisis, says the reporter, played by joel. i'm referring to the war, mr. jones. oh, that, well, to tell you the truth, i've not begin it much thought. you don't keep up with the foreign news, do you? well how would you li
, america is losing the battle against mary jane. this year new hampshire and illinois legalized medical marijuana bringing the to 20 the number of states where your pharmacist will soon look like this. (laughter) the dude prescribes. (laughter) and folks, the war on nugs used to have a strong ally on cnn's dr. sanjay gupta who opposed legalizing pot until now. >> i want to remind you that in 2009 you wrote a "time" magazine article entitled why i would vote no on pot. you changed your mind. >> i have. and as part of, you know, my thinking, the reason, i have apologized for some of the earlier reporting because i think, you know, we've been terribly and systemically mislead in this country for some time. and i did part of that misleading. >> stephen: wait a second, we were misinformed by a cable news doctor? (laughter) next you'll tell me i can't get directions to my cousin's house from fareed zakaria's gps. come on fareed, less on syria, more on how i get to where greg lives. (laughter) it's bad enough that is an jay gupta or as i now call him ganja soupta, okay-- (laughter) a global, g
for al jazeera america. >>my name is ranjani chakraborty, i'm from houston, texas. >>i'm kim bondy. >>nicole deford. >>and i'm from new orleans. >>san francisco, california. when i was a little kid, i just really loved the news. >>news was always important in my family. >>i knew as a kid that was exactly what i wanted to do. >>i learned to read by reading the newspaper with my great-grandfather every morning. >>and i love being able to tell other people stories. >>this is it, i want to be a part of this. >>this is what really drove me to al jazeera america. >> very much followed one of the two main camps. when they were aligned with the brotherhood and morsi, they kind of towed that line because they were against th. and like she said, they have no problem with a crackdown on the brotherhood by the military. and right now they really don't have leadership that is in the public sphere. they don't have someone who can speak on their behalf. they don't have someone who represents their opinions, and that makes it very difficult for them to really have a voice in decision-making. >> th
say the same? and i'm from dallas, texas, and i'm an anchor for al jazeera america. i started in a small television station in rural arkansas. it's a part of the country that often gets overlooked. but there are a lot of fascinating people there, a lot of fascinating stories there. i like that al jazeera will pay attention to those kinds of places. what drew me to journalism is i like the idea that we are documenting history. al jazeera documents it like none other. and to be a journalist, and to be part of a team like that? that's an incredible blessing. what happens when social media uncovers unheard, fascinating news stories? >>they share it on the stream. >>social media isn't an afterthought. it drives discussion across america. >>al jazeera america social media community, on tv and online. >>this is your outlet for those conversations. >>post, upload, and interact. >>every night, share undiscovered stories. be and let me just show you what 13,000 people living under canvas looks like. they built this from scratch. the camp need clean water, sanitation. there is a lot that
>>> good morning, america. and at this hour, momentum building for an american strike on the syrian armed forces. responsible for the chemical attack. the crucial phone call intercepted between those responsible, as the u.n. asked for more time to get weapon inspectors out. >>> i have a dream. >> 50 years after the march on washington. and one of the most famous speeches ever made, the president returns to the lincoln memorial today, with a renewed call on race equality in america right now. >> free at last. >>> breaking overnight. michael douglas and catherine zeta-jones separate after almost 13 years. insiders reveal the a-listers are taking a break. what's driven one of hollywood's high-wattage couples apart? >>> and meet the new american teen phenom shooting to stardom overnight. her father once trapped under the rubble of a massive earthquake, cheering her on. this morning, victoria duval's cinderella story. >>> and good morning, america. so many developments happening right now. this just in, the first confirmation from the u.n. team in syria. that civilians were attacked by a
, in this place, at this time 50 years ago today, dr. martin luther king shared his dream for america with america. dr. king was the passionate voice that awakened the conscience of a nation. and inspired people all over the world. the power of his words resonated because they were spoken out of an unwavering belief in freedom and justice, equality and opportunity for all. let freedom ring was dr. king's closing call for a better and more just america. so today people from all walks of life will gather at 3:00 p.m. for bell ringing events across our great country and around the world as we reaffirm our commitment to dr. king's ideals. dr. king believed that our destinies are all intertwined. and he knew that our hopes and our dreams are really all the same. he challenged us to see how we all are more alike than we are different. so as the bells of freedom ring today, we are hoping that it's a time for all of us to reflect on not only the progress that has been made, and we've made a lot, but on what we have accomplished, and also on the work that still remains before us. it's an opportunity today
of justice flickered. it never died. because they kept marching, america changed. because they marched, the civil rights law was passed. because they marched, the voting rights law was assigned. because they marched, doors of opportunity in education swung open so their daughters and sons could imagine a life for themselves beyond washing someone else's laundry or shining someone else's shoes. because they marched, city councils changed and state legislatures changed and congress changed. eventually the white house changed. [cheers and applause] because they marched, america became more free and more fair. not just for african-americans, but for women and latinos. asians and native americans. catholics, jews, and muslims. for gays, for americans with disabilities. america changed for you and for me. the entire world drew strength from that example, whether it be young people who watched from the other side of an iron curtain and would eventually tear down that wall, or the young people inside south africa would eventually end the scourge of apartheid. [cheers and applause] those are th
.vitac.com >>> tonight, pot in america. >> i think its deserves some respect, so i always call it cannabis. >> the biggest cash crop in the u.s. should it be legal? should it be taxed? is it a gateway drug that leads to addiction. >> without question, i think legalizing marijuana would be a huge mistake. >> taking you to the front lines of the battle, the beverly hills woman that said lighting up makes them better moms. >> i feel like i'm more interactive with my children. >> and i ask dr. sanjay gupta how dangerous is it really? >> every 19 minutes someone dies of prescription drug overdose but doesn't happen with marijuana. >> and what really happens inside a medical dispensary. >> the clinic is run like a typical health clinic. it's beautiful inside. >> this is the special report gone to pot, america's marijuana obsession. >>> good evening. the fight over pot grows, so does the use. recently washington d.c. opened the first medical marijuana dispensary, with other states that legalized it more medical uses. should it be a crime? we'll take a closer look tonight. >>> also, dr. sanjay gup
will start with violence in egypt. bret stephens and peter beinart disagree as usual. >>> then, is america overregulated? does the government have altogether too much of a say in how we live our lives? i'll ask the man who put many of the obama administration's regulations in place, cass c sunstein. >>> also underneath the violence, is the arab world the new start-up society? that's what an american venture capitalist believes. and while we're at innovation, is north korea going to beat apple at its own game? obviously no, but i will explain. >>> but first, here's my take. if there is one crisis that both the american left and right agree is real, it is of declining mobility. the american dream is at heart that someone no matter his or her background can make it in this country. a few weeks ago, four economists at harvard and the university of california at berkeley released a path-breaking study of mobility within the united states. and last week, the "journal of economic perspectives" published a series of essays tackling the question from an international perspective. the research is ca
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